Report confirms Australian drinking trend

Mark Willingham Uncategorized

Report confirms Australian drinking trend

 

Source: TheShout

By Andy Young

June 30th

 

A new report released this week has confirmed the trend which shows that while Australian consumers are drinking less, the per capita spend on alcohol is increasing.

 

The Enhanced Media Metrics Australia (Emma) Alcoholic Beverages Trends and Insights Report, found that half of people aged 18 years and over say that they are drinking less now than they used to. The report also highlighted the increased spend and move to premium beverages, with the dollar value of liquor sales rising by 1.5 per cent in 2015.

 

“Alcohol is still very much part of Australian culture, with three quarters of adult men and women consuming an alcoholic beverage in the past four weeks. Alcohol also features heavily in people’s social lives with the majority preferring to drink with friends,” Ipsos Connect executive director – Emma™, Jane Nicholls, said.

 

“The trend towards drinking better offers growth opportunities to premium brands that can tap into the mindset of these consumers. The move by Australians towards more premium beverages and spending more as a result, underscores the importance of effective brand positioning and marketing.”

 

The report also highlighted that wine and beer remain Australia’s most popular drinks. The report found that wine is the nation’s most popular drink, although men up to the age of 65 prefer beer.

 

Cider is our third most popular drink, followed by scotch or whiskey, with other varieties well behind. Women opt for wine more than twice as often as other drinks, whereas men are more varied in their consumption patterns.

 

White wine edges out red as the most consumed at 43 per cent of adults, compared to 41 per cent, while 23 per cent enjoy sparkling wine or champagne.

 

Perceptions of quality and value change as people age and the Emma data shows that older people are more likely to believe that Australian wine is better than that from overseas. They were also less likely to try foreign beers, preferring home-grown brands.